Friday, July 10, 2015

Seriously! When did adopting a dog become as difficult as adopting a human child?

We have always had at least one dog, usually two and once we had three at the same time. Nearly 20 years ago we adopted two Australian Shepherds, Carrie and Rudy, through rescue programs. Many years later we adopted an Newfoundland named Marley through a rescue. Our most recent boy was Grant whom you may remember. We lost him back in August while we were in Minnesota. 
Grant on the left and Carrie on the Right

While Rob was still in the hospital back in April we decided we were going to get a furry addition to our family. We began our search soon after Rob was discharged and while we were still in Benson, AZ.  
Carrie on the left and Marley on the Right
with my bestie Judi way back in 2005

We did a lot of searching online and found a darling little dog at the pound and went to see her. We did end up taking her home but we had to return her the following day. She was completely covered with dozens of ticks, she bit me that evening and the next day we took her to the vet to help get the ticks off and evaluate her. She tried to bite the vet as well. We decided we couldn't risk a biter with 6 grandchildren and a seventh on the way. 
Me with Marley back in 2006

A few days later we found a dog named Romeo who seemed perfect for us but he had valley fever and would need a few more weeks of treatment before he could be neutered so we couldn't adopt him because we were leaving the area. 

Along the way home we searched and have discovered dog adoption has become a big business. It seems many shelters give preference to rescue organizations for specific breeds and mixes. If you aren't the rescue organization, you can't adopt the dog. It seem that most pets in need of homes are listed on Petfinder.com. You can read about available pets on their site then you have to fill out an application before you can even talk to someone about a dog. We have filled out several applications. We have gotten a couple of responses, one saying we are out of their service area and another saying they have many applicants for a specific dog so if we happen to make the cut they'll let us know. Sometimes we don't even get a response. 

If you are fortunate enough to have your application approved and actually hear back from the rescue, you are in for a long process of vetting. They schedule a home visit, check your references, get approval from the "board" at the rescue. Most state up front you must have a fenced yard. (We don't even have a yard.) If you pass all of their tests and phone calls and home visits, etc. they generally charge about $500 dollars for the adoption fee. How on earth did this happen?

We have considered purchasing a dog but Grant was purchased from a reputable breeder and was the most challenging dog we have ever had in terms of medical issues and separation anxiety. Additionally dogs from a breeder run between $1000 and $3000 dollars. 

Now if we wanted a Pit Bull or a Chihuahua we could pick 10 up at the pound tomorrow. Unfortunately Pit Bulls are not generally welcomed in RV parks and Chihuahuas are not for us. We are big, hairy, happy dog people. How sad that there are so many dogs out there who need good home and we have a great home and lots of love to offer and we can't seem to measure up to dog rescue organization standards. Something has gone terribly wrong and it makes me very sad. I'll stop now. 

10 comments:

  1. We have three dogs (had four but the older one passed away) and love them very much. The youngest one was given to my wife at an RV park we stopped in on our way from Texas to Pennsylvania. My wife was walking one of our pups and this women and little girl walked up and plopped this little dog in my wife's arms, stuck the papers under her arm, and told her that the dog's name was Gizzy. It was a sick little pup but we nursed it back to health and it is now very, very happy here with us and the other two dogs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well I don't imagine someone will plop a dog into my arms but we'll keep at it. Maybe we'll just break down and buy a puppy but ouch they are expensive.

      Delete
  2. Don't know where you are but try the newspaper ads for dogs. Way less than breeders and some good dogs to be " rescued". I swear dog rescues has become big business. I know someone who does it for the $$$. Good luck! Any dog adopted by an RV'er has a wonderful life ahead of them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Anonymous! I'll take a look.

      Delete
  3. I totally agree with what you are saying. I will soon be a full time solo Rver and want to adopt a dog, but so far because I have not fenced yard I am out of luck. I feel bad for the pups who just want someone to love them!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,
      I wish you luck in your K-9 search and in your RV adventure!
      Juley

      Delete
  4. There are so many things involved with rescue dogs and their organizations. We have two rescued Cocker Spaniels. We are not full time, so did have a house check. Most rescuers have seen too many of their rescues lost, mistreated, given away to homes that are not accectable, that I can see why they are cautious. As with anything, there are good and bad rescue groups. We paid about $125 for ours, but keep in mind, they are vetted, neutered, chipped,and fed until someone adopts them. I know there are a lot of good rescue groups, keep looking and good luck. Hope you find one to give a good loving home to.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cathie,
      I think some caution is very wise but I also think it's getting out of hand. I don't mind paying for a dog either but when the rescue is charging upward of $500 dollars for a dog with no medical issues it seems excessive. That said, I know there are great rescues with the best interests of the dogs at heart so we'll keep looking. I'm sure it'll happen in time. Thanks for your comments!
      Juley

      Delete
  5. Thank you for this post! We had a beautiful golden retriever and when we lost her tried to adopt from several rescue groups. Although our Vet was more than willing to give us a recommendation we were told that since we live on 43 acres of fields and woods we were NOT suitable because we had "too much land" which they felt meant our dog would not be properly supervised and 'contained'! We have had dogs ranging in size from a small terrier to a St. Bernard and never had problems keeping them in the actual 'yard'. We have a large tree shaded 30' by 30' chain link pen with a 4x8 shelter yet we were not allowed to adopt. We did eventually find a Chocolate Lab through friends who knew she needed a new home. Sadly stories like this are much too common.
    Sue

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sue O.,
      That's insanity! Your place sound like my idea of doggie heaven. Perhaps you should start your own rescue? Glad you finally found your four legged baby.
      Juley

      Delete